What a child’s skull looks like during teething

Have you ever wondered why children are in pain when they are teething?  Have you hesitated to give them something for that pain? Maybe you have even told them to ‘suck it up’ or ‘it’s not that bad’.  This picture may change your mind.  After seeing this, I’m kinda glad that we don’t remember the pain of our teeth moving in our skulls.

This skull is on exhibit at the Hunterian Museum at  The Royal College of Surgeons of England in London.

childs double teeth What a childs skull looks like during teething

Photo by Stefan Schäfer

via twentytwowords

Recent Comments

  1. holly COW :) Glad I have my Forevergreen Lavender/Chamomile Blend to help with inflimation, pain, and healing. Ohhhhh did I say calming? Yes calming also! Next step for my 8 year old will be the 10 year molars…….. UGh

  2. Our little chilled out baby seems to be teething… and is not so chilled out about it. After seeing this picture I feel less guilty about resorting to calpol.

  3. Ever wonder where all of your kids teeth are inside their heads? This is a crazy photo.

  4. Crazy what our little ones have to go through!

  5. yikes! With this visual I feel really bad forthe little one.

  6. This has nothing to do with teething.
    This is probably a 6-8-year-old's skull (sadly). The teeth are already in, and the lower incisors have already fallen out and the adult ones are growing in.

  7. Shawnee Lynn O'Rawe

    Exactly! And I don't remember any pain when my grown up teeth were coming in! But I DO know my daughter is in pain with her more recent baby teeth coming in, she cries all day. I try to avoid giving her tylenol, only because it's so bad for you, but I will give it to her for bedtime if she's having a really bad day. Other than that I just try to nurse her thru it. Poor babes.

  8. Shawnee Lynn O'Rawe

    Exactly! And I don't remember any pain when my grown up teeth were coming in! But I DO know my daughter is in pain with her more recent baby teeth coming in, she cries all day. I try to avoid giving her tylenol, only because it's so bad for you, but I will give it to her for bedtime if she's having a really bad day. Other than that I just try to nurse her thru it. Poor babes.

  9. Shawnee Lynn O'Rawe

    Exactly! And I don't remember any pain when my grown up teeth were coming in! But I DO know my daughter is in pain with her more recent baby teeth coming in, she cries all day. I try to avoid giving her tylenol, only because it's so bad for you, but I will give it to her for bedtime if she's having a really bad day. Other than that I just try to nurse her thru it. Poor babes.

  10. Look at that photo one more time… Now look under the nose. All those teeth are about to come in. That kid was teething!

  11. Amber Meriwether Now look at all the teeth that are already in – that's not teething, those are adult teeth descending.

  12. That kid only had 2 adult teeth at that point showing…
    Look at the skull above the top teeth under the nose you can clearly see all the adult teeth starting to form and about to come down.
    FYI the 2 bottom teeth are almost alway the first to come in.

  13. Teething is in baby's when their baby teeth are starting to come in. This is clearly an older child who is losing his baby teeth and having adult teeth come in. Also, a baby' skull looks totally different as illustrated here: https://www.uofmhealth.org/sites/default/files/healthwise/media/medical/hw/n5551240.jpg

  14. Christine Roberts

    Wow !!!!!!

  15. Teething is not complete until all your teeth are in.

  16. Kristina Mayré All this person's baby teeth were in. The two you see ascending from the bottom are the adult teeth replacing the lower baby teeth. This is a child of several years old.

  17. Amber Meriwether Yes, there are only 2 adult teeth coming through there, but all of the baby teeth are already out, and the person has lost the bottom 2 baby teeth where the adult teeth are coming in. This is not an infant, this is a child of the age that they're losing their baby teeth. You can see that all of the baby teeth have grown in.

  18. I've worked in the dental field for years. Twelve year molars can be very painful erupting. I remember mine. I've seen children with impacted teeth that don't fully erupt. I've also seen children lose baby teeth and have their gums completely heal over before the adult teeth come in. It's a process much like growing pains when your bones are growing and stretching. The same happens with your buds in your jaw.

  19. Pamela Monson Stoddard

    Now you all should read the caption again. It did NOT say it was a baby, but a CHILD. When your adult teeth come in, you are not yet an adult…..and it is still called teething. I remember the feeling of having to chew on something to fight the pain, so big dummy that I was, I chewed on the end of my braids, or on my pencil, LOL

  20. Pamela Monson Stoddard

    Now you all should read the caption again. It did NOT say it was a baby, but a CHILD. When your adult teeth come in, you are not yet an adult…..and it is still called teething. I remember the feeling of having to chew on something to fight the pain, so big dummy that I was, I chewed on the end of my braids, or on my pencil, LOL

  21. Shawnee Lynn O'Rawe

    lol that's weird, i had no pain with my teeth coming in.

  22. When adult teeth come in, is it not still called teething (serious question)?

  23. never once says its a newborn/babies skull. clearly says children.

  24. They call it teething (pain caused by teeth basically making a hole in the gums), only babies experience this.

  25. Babies are not the only ones that experience this. Around 6 years old you get your first set of perm molars around age 12 you get your second set and then if you have wisdom teeth you go through the teething process again…

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